El LoCo de las Ciencias Reales y Ficticias

todo el Universo puede ser explicado... pase y pregunte   acá se mezclan las ciencias, la matemática y todo aquello digno de un orgulloso nerd. Usa tu cerebro y aprende todos los días.

Si tus clases eran/han/son fomes, prepárate para una nueva forma de enseñar/aprender.

twitter.com/robbiefreak:

    msarahm:

    FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THINGS COMIC WILL SOMEONE PLEASE TAKE A PICTURE OF THE BACK OF DC BOMBSHELL BATGIRL?!?! PLEAAASE image

    Im trying to cosplay her but i have no idea what her back looks like, is that a backpack? is that bat logo on it? Im saving up funds to buy the actual figure but until then PLEASE i just need a reference picture!

    (via rodrorg)

    — 8 months ago with 6 notes

    jaidefinichon:

    La edición de Breaking Bad definitiva 

    #breakingBad la mejor compra navideña

    (Source: heisenbergchronicles)

    — 8 months ago with 4093 notes

    #batman JAJAJAJAJJAAJAJA reí en proporciones bíblicas. Y no, no tiene nada que ver con Affleck

    (Source: chileandude86, via jaidefinichon)

    — 12 months ago with 1418 notes

    "bienvenido al planeta… bienvenido a El Planeta"

    (Source: hemsworthc, via ismahell)

    — 12 months ago with 2411 notes
    SIN CENSURA!! SIN CENSURA!! SIN CENSURA!! 

    SIN CENSURA!! SIN CENSURA!! SIN CENSURA!! 

    (Source: slavicinferno, via rodrorg)

    — 1 year ago with 184 notes
    el mejor show que he visto en el cable EVER

    el mejor show que he visto en el cable EVER

    (via zeroraws-deactivated20140708)

    — 1 year ago with 144 notes
    astronemma:

How to See a Black Hole

Black holes are essentially invisible, but astronomers are developing technology to image the immediate surroundings of these enigmas like never before. Within a few years, experts say, scientists may have the first-ever picture of the environment around a black hole, and could even spot the theorized “shadow” of a black hole itself.
Black holes are hard to see in detail because the large ones are all far away. The closest supermassive black hole is the one thought to inhabit the center of the Milky Way, called Sagittarius A* (pronounced “Sagittarius A-star”), which lies about 26,000 light-years away. This is the first target for an ambitious international project to image a black hole in greater detail than ever before, called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT).
The EHT will combine observations from telescopes all over the world, including facilities in the United States, Mexico, Chile, France, Greenland and the South Pole, into one virtual image with a resolution equal to what would be achieved by a single telescope the size of the distance between the separated facilities.

Read more via SPACE.com
Image: prediction of what Sagittarius A* will look like when imaged by the Event Horizon Telescope. Credit: Dexter, J., Agol, E., Fragile, P. C., McKinney, J. C., 2010, The Astrophysical Journal, 717, 1092.


el espectro electromagnético es hermoso. Nos permite ver lo invisible #RowRowFightThePower

    astronemma:

    How to See a Black Hole

    Black holes are essentially invisible, but astronomers are developing technology to image the immediate surroundings of these enigmas like never before. Within a few years, experts say, scientists may have the first-ever picture of the environment around a black hole, and could even spot the theorized “shadow” of a black hole itself.

    Black holes are hard to see in detail because the large ones are all far away. The closest supermassive black hole is the one thought to inhabit the center of the Milky Way, called Sagittarius A* (pronounced “Sagittarius A-star”), which lies about 26,000 light-years away. This is the first target for an ambitious international project to image a black hole in greater detail than ever before, called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT).

    The EHT will combine observations from telescopes all over the world, including facilities in the United States, Mexico, Chile, France, Greenland and the South Pole, into one virtual image with a resolution equal to what would be achieved by a single telescope the size of the distance between the separated facilities.

    Read more via SPACE.com

    Image: prediction of what Sagittarius A* will look like when imaged by the Event Horizon Telescope. Credit: Dexter, J., Agol, E., Fragile, P. C., McKinney, J. C., 2010, The Astrophysical Journal, 717, 1092.

    el espectro electromagnético es hermoso. Nos permite ver lo invisible #RowRowFightThePower

    (via we-are-star-stuff)

    — 1 year ago with 3017 notes